SBG In A World of Percentages

When it comes to standards based grading (SBG) I consider myself ‘All In’.  I’ve been practicing SBG in my classroom for about 4 years and for the first time in my 22 year career I’m happy with my grading system.  Up until this semester I’ve been using a 10 scale rubric because it makes for an easy transition to percentages.  I stole this from someone on twitter and I apologize that I cannot cite my source for this.  If anyone knows where it came from, please give this person credit in the comments section.

Rubric

This semester, looking to take things to the next level, I tried a the classic 4 scale rubric.

4- Exceeds Mastery
3- Demonstrates Mastery
2- Working Towards Mastery
1- Showing Little Mastery

In the beginning of the semester I was quite excited however I quickly learned that this rubric has several drawbacks which made for a difficult semester to say the least.  First off, there isn’t an easy transition to percentages that worked for my grade book (we use powerschool).  I used the Marzano model to convert to percentages however I had to do this manually for each student.

MarzanoIt proved to be a major pain so I only did this at the time progress reports were due.  My students grew frustrated with me because they wanted to know their percentage after every summative assessment and I wasn’t able to provide it to them.  The other major hangup with this system was concerning academic eligibility.  The school requires me to report a grade for each of my students every week. Normally, they pull the percentages from the grade book however since my percentages were not up to date, I had to provide a manual letter grade.  Many, many, many of man hours later, I’m deciding to go back to my 10 scale rubric for the next semester and future semesters after this.

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2 thoughts on “SBG In A World of Percentages

  1. Andrew Knauft

    I also use Powerschool, with a five-scale rubric, and ran into similar issues last year with converting to percentages for it. This year I used Tools>Preferences>Score Codes to allow me to simply type “stg3” — PS then treats it as if I had typed 85%, calculates the appropriate score, and prints “Stage 3” in the “Grd” column of the student report.
    I think you’ve given me a topic for a new blog post 🙂 Thanks!

    Reply

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